The argument here basically boils down to what you’re looking to do more: Cast creatures or kill things. So how low are we trying to make the mana curve, while taking into consideration how much bang for the buck is still needed? do as far as affecting the game, but it will make it into the game and have an effect, even in much more powerful metas. So as you might imagine, the deck has gone through some revisions. Given that you get tokens equal to the converted mana cost of each creature spell you cast, this is easy to do. If you really want to be 90% sure, both the … Rather than throw my weight behind that tactic, instead I’d like to get to the heart of some of the issues that crop up when you’re sitting there with a pile of cards in front of you that all seem necessary and excellent. If you are doing well and have a bunch of vamps and tokens in play why not just push a wincon instead? The argument here basically boils down to what you’re looking to do more: Cast creatures or kill things. This means there’ve been many times I sat down with a stack of six cards I think might be good in the deck… but had no idea what to cut. If your deck leans toward killing creatures at every turn, whether that be through, (especially since a board wipe means you have creatures and no one else does). Still, at a certain point, as my playgroup evolved, more and more I noticed that I was sitting there on turn six with only my Commander and a mana guy in play and five expensive creatures in my hand, while others around me were already starting to put together win conditions. Having enough mana to cast your commander does not mean you have the right colors or good cards in hand. Thragtusk is a manageable five mana for five power and five life, and it gets you a 3/3 when it shuffles off the mortal coil. A buddy has a different sort of "syphon" build, where he is running Edgar as more of a combo build with. Doug has been an avid Magic player since Fallen Empires, when his older brother traded him some epic blue Homarids for all of his Islands. ’s 67,013 decks. I just listed six expensive creatures above. This not only explains my irrational love of Goblin Grenade, but also a lot of my useless knowledge about old, obscure cards. This not only explains my irrational love of, , but also a lot of my useless knowledge about old, obscure cards. The fact that those Rat tokens also get deathtouch makes that cycle a bit easier to maintain. For Endrek, that means that he’ll put himself there if too many tokens end up on the battlefield at once. 1 Deck Totals. Ogre Slumlord vs Endrek Sahr, Master Breeder. , probably in spite of his $0.35 price tag rather than because of it, is still the more popular of the two choices. The mana curve is a concept that entered the Magic canon shortly after the first Pro Tour. Ads by Fandom. (Unless you're Ken Nagle, in which case you do it right to left.) Good for chip damage (repeated small attacks), Good vs creature based decks (especially tokens). It could also be great if you’re not the one killing your creatures, but rather an opponent casts a board wipe and you end up with a blocker still in play. Either way, you’re still going to be able to reliably make tokens earlier in the game than you might be able to with the big splashy Avenger of Zendikar. 3 Results. Basically, Filigree doesn’t do what Pelakka Wurm and Thragtusk do as far as affecting the game, but it will make it into the game and have an effect, even in much more powerful metas. , on the other hand, does a great Pelakka Wurm impression, while being much cuter and ultimately probably much less impactful. Vicious Shadows-> Iroas, God of Victory I want to make some room for Iroas. If you’re more focused on being a deck that casts a lot of creatures, some of which happen to mess about with the graveyard and recursion and sacrifice effects, then Endrek Sahr might be the better choice. While neither generate tokens upon entering the battlefield like the seven-mana favorites Hornet Queen and Avenger of Zendikar, there is no disputing that if you’re looking for quantity in tokens at a cheaper mana cost, both Ogre Slumlord and Endrek Sahr can do it for you. Naturally, I built a Wort, the Raidmother land destruction deck designed for two players and no fun whatsoever. It’ll gain you some life upon entering the battlefield, maybe get to swing in, and upon death will replace itself with another card. Adds to your board complexity (bad vs sweepers). It must be stated, however, that those numbers absolutely pale in comparison to. I was going to jam some vamps last night but it ended up that people wanted to play some Massive Darkness so we played that instead. AKA. When this specific deck was first made and EDHREC didn’t exist, however, Elder Dragon Highlander as a whole was a much more Timmy/Tammy environment than it is now. So. Bad vs decks that don't intend to use defenders to block. So, I set about cutting down the mana cost of the deck, as many of us do when we want a deck to go up in power level. In essence, it is the idea that you should have a smooth transition between your low-, medium-, and high-cost cards in a given deck, raising the probability that you will be able to play low-cost spells early and still have larger spells … Given that you get tokens equal to the converted mana cost of each creature spell you cast, this is easy to do. Limited (40-card decks) The optimal curve for a turn-5 format: 0 One-Drops 8 Two-Drops 7 Three-Drops 4 Four-Drops 2 Five-Drops 19 Land. I was also backing those up with even more creatures outside the top 100 list that were also in the 6-8 range, like Panglacial Wurm, Pelakka Wurm, and Wurmcoil Engine (I had a bit of a Wurm thing, I think). Its protection is not friendly with tokens. For the. Nailed it. As for Commander specifically, I’ve been a part of the format since 2010, when a buddy of mine introduced me to this wild new concept of using a legendary creature as a commander. Maybe add, So this is a completely different deck idea/approach with Edgar. And indeed, the deckbuilders do appreciate this particular effect, having put him in 3,087 decks. My name is Doug, and I’ve been playing, . Basically, Filigree doesn’t do what. This means that if you’re more focused on killing creatures with noncreature spells, or setting up fantastic loops of creatures going from the graveyard to the battlefield and back again, that the needle may indeed lean back a bit toward Ogre Slumlord. (I had a bit of a Wurm thing, I think). Lowering the Mana Curve. The amount of anthem for the mana is just sort of ok. Given that we’re talking about decks playing with sacrifice effects and graveyard shenanigans, it’s pretty hard to beat that. Even in the case that you do end up killing him, you’re luckily already in a deck that specializes in bringing creatures back from the graveyard. Now, to be clear here, there is nothing wrong with playing any of those cards in any deck. Looking through the Top 100 Creatures on EDHREC, we can see many friendly faces that have ended up in various Golgari decks over the years. I was also backing those up with even more creatures outside the top 100 list that. Over eight years, it has gone from a pile of literally all creatures with an average converted mana cost of approximately 17 to a streamlined monster that will sacrifice and recur Gray Merchant of Asphodel, Solemn Simulacrum, and Kokusho, the Evening Star three times a turn while wiping your whole board with Phyrexian Plaguelord. Ending up in 3,631 decks isn’t such a surprise, because even if you do care more about killing your own creatures, Endrek works beautifully with sacrifice outlets. On initial look at this topic, I’m sure many of you scoffed at this even being a competition. That feeling of indecision is exactly what this series is about. So instead, let’s go further down the mana curve. is a fine card, if a bit expensive. Let me know in the comments so we can all help each other get to 99. Filigree Familiar, however, is substantially cheaper at three mana, and still gains you life upon entering and draws you a card upon leaving. Looking through the Top 100 Creatures on EDHREC, we can see many friendly faces that have ended up in various Golgari decks over the years. On initial look at this topic, I’m sure many of you scoffed at this even being a competition. As for Commander specifically, I’ve been a part of the format since 2010, when a buddy of mine introduced me to this wild new concept of using a legendary creature as a commander. They’re big and they do fun things, which, for a lot of us, is exactly what Commander is about. Still, at a certain point, as my playgroup evolved, more and more I noticed that I was sitting there on turn six with only my Commander and a. in play and five expensive creatures in my hand, while others around me were already starting to put together win conditions. , that means the more nontoken creatures that die, the more tokens you’ll get. , however, is substantially cheaper at three mana, and still gains you life upon entering and draws you a card upon leaving. Track Your Collection. So really the biggest restriction here is that his ability only triggers when you, This means that if you’re more focused on killing creatures with noncreature spells, or setting up fantastic loops of creatures going from the graveyard to the battlefield and back again, that the needle may indeed lean back a bit toward, .