From the 1920s through the 1950s, the Delaware Senate was competitive and it often switched partisan control. The new unicameral Legislature met for the first time in 1937 and is the only nonpartisan legislature in the United States.[27]. From 1992 to 2018, neither Democrats or Republicans held more than the 90 seats required to override a gubernatorial veto. This is a list of United States state legislatures.Each state in the United States has a legislature as part of its form of civil government. Federal district and territorial legislatures. Republicans picked up 11 seats in that election and won a 31-19 majority. In the 2018 elections, the chamber flipped once more to a 233-167 Democratic majority. Florida State Senate Party Control: 1992-2018, Before 1992, Democrats had controlled the Florida State Senate since the 1876 elections, which came in the aftermath of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Between the time of Franklin Roosevelt (D) and George W. Bush (R), the political party of the president lost, on average, 450 state legislative seats while holding the White House. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). After the 2018 elections, the parties split control of the House. That Republican majority held until the 2006 elections, when Democrats gained nine seats. Three or fewer seats needed to flip to change control of the chamber. A power-sharing agreement was agreed between Democrats and Republicans where Democrats held the top leadership position in 2001 and Republicans held the position in 2002.[18]. Democrats flipped two legislative chambers. From 1992 to 2018, the Delaware Senate was controlled by Democrats, often by significant margins. In 2016, Republicans lost two seats, bringing their caucus to 21 members — the bare minimum for a majority. Partisan balance In the 2010 elections, Republicans took control of the legislature after they flipped both chambers in 2010. From 1992 to 2018, Republicans won consistent but not overwhelming majorities, with Democrats usually holding enough seats to control at least one-third of the chamber and be within striking range of a majority in the next election cycle. Partisan control Operations: Meghann Olshefski • Lauren Dixon • Kelly Rindfleisch • Sara Antel • Sara Horton. Michigan House of Representatives Still, their gains were small in the two elections that followed and the chamber majority remained out of reach. † Includes legislators who are listed officially as unaffiliated, unenrolled, nonpartisan, etc. During that time, Democrats usually controlled between 102 and 239 seats, while Republicans controlled between 161 and 298 seats. Between 1992 and 2018, partisan control of the New Hampshire State Senate fluctuated. 15% or less of the seats up for election in 2020 needed to flip to change control of the chamber. After the 2018 elections, Democrats held a 21-14 majority. Their majority was bolstered by the 1994 election, rising to 64-36. After the 2018 elections, they held a 54-46 majority. Democrats controlled the chamber from 1987 until the 1998 election. Democrats had their largest majority following the 1992 election when Democrats held a 28-seat advantage. Between 1992 and 2018, majority control of the state Senate changed five times. After the 2008 election, Democrats held 21 seats, the most their party had held since the 1958 elections. After the 2018 elections, Republicans held a 30-18 majority with one legislator unaffiliated. In the years from 2008 to 2016, Democrats lost seats every election, eventually bringing their majority to 11-10 following the 2016 elections. Democrats regained control of the chamber in the 2012 elections when the party picked up 11 seats. Ballotpedia features 318,400 encyclopedic articles written and curated by our professional staff of editors, writers, and researchers. Democrats won 15 seats in 2000, forcing a power-sharing agreement between the parties where a Republican served as Senate president while Democrats controlled key committees.[7]. In the 2006 elections, Democrats picked up 91 seats and held a 239-161 majority. After the 2018 special elections, Republicans held a 35-32 majority. Arizona State Senate Party Control: 1992-2018, From 1992 to 2018, Republicans held control of the chamber after all elections except one, but elections were competitive as they rarely controlled more than 18 of the chamber's 30 seats. Between 1992 and 2008, partisan control of the North Carolina House of Representatives fluctuated, swinging back and forth between the Democratic and Republican parties. New Hampshire House of Representatives Party Control: 1992-2018. The United States also has one federal district and five non-state territories with local legislative branches, which are also listed below. Pennsylvania State Senate Ballotpedia’s approach to determining what is and is not a battleground chamber relied on a series of criteria, with exceptions made in specific outlying cases. North Carolina House of Representatives Data after 2006 was compiled by Ballotpedia staff. Between 1992 and 2018, majority control of the state House changed seven times. As of October 30, 2020, Republicans controlled 52.07% of all state legislative seats nationally, while Democrats held 46.80%. Republicans held a veto-proof supermajority from 2011 through 2018, losing it in the 2018 election. Heading into the 2020 elections, Republicans held 21 state government trifectas to Democrats' 15, majority control of 59 state legislative chambers to Democrats' 39, and control of 26 governors' offices to Democrats' 24. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). External Relations: Alison Prange • Sara Key • Sarah Rosier • Kari Berger All current Nebraskan legislators are referred to as “Senators”, as the pre-1937 senate was the retained house. However, their gains receded in the following election and they did not eclipse the 40-seat mark. Since that year, control of the chamber changed three times. The number of seats up for election in 2020 that changed partisan control the last time they were up was greater than the number of seats that needed to flip to change control of the chamber. Delaware State Senate Party Control: 1992-2018. The table below shows the partisan history of the Michigan House of Representatives following every general election from 1992 to 2018. Republicans held that majority until the 2016 elections, when Democrats retook control of the chamber. Of the 10 times partisan control changed, eight occurred between 1964 and 2010. That Republican majority held until the 2006 elections, when Democrats gained 19 seats. Democrats controlled the chamber following the 1900 elections. Partisan balance Republicans made steady gains after 1988 and eventually won the necessary seats to claim a majority in the chamber. Most of the fundamental details of the legislature are specified in the state constitution. Democrat Bethany Hall-Long resigned her seat in 2017 to become the state's lieutenant governor and left the chamber in a 10-10 tie. This was new for the chamber because prior to 1992 it was under solid Democratic control (like most southern state legislatures). The table below shows the partisan history of the Arizona Senate following every general election from 1992 to 2018. Arizona House of Representatives Florida State Senate Minnesota House of Representatives Party Control: 1992-2018. Democrats held that majority until the 2016 elections, when Republicans retook control of the chamber. The table below shows the partisan history of the North Carolina House of Representatives following every general election from 1992 to 2018. Republicans gained six seats in the 1994 elections, moving the chamber to 26-8 in favor of Democrats. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). Colorado State Senate Party Control: 1992-2018. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). It is normal for a party to lose ground in state legislatures when their party controls the presidency for two terms. During the House's 2018 elections, Democrats obtained a 233-167 majority, flipping the 227-173 Republican-controlled chamber which arose after the 2016 elections. Map 2 shows the states that have either Democratic or Republican trifectas versus those where there is some split in power. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). By the 1970s and 1980s, Republicans had established themselves as a formidable minority party, but they still could not win control of the chamber. Control of the Alaska House of Representatives was split under a power-sharing agreement, although Republicans had a 22-15 majority. In the 1994 election, they picked up six more seats and eclipsed the 20-seat mark. Data after 2006 was compiled by Ballotpedia staff. However, the elections from 2010 to 2014 widened the gap between the parties. From 2010 to 2019, there were 63 instances where a state legislative chamber changed partisan control.